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SimONE

Philip
25
Nigeria
Apr 15 '14
dresslikea:

#tyylit inspiration - business in tones of brown
Suit: Isaia Cardigan: Malo Shirt: Emanuele Maffeis Shoes: Edward Green 
Bag: Burberry Tie: Drake’s London PS: Viola Milano Shades: Oliver Peoples

dresslikea:

#tyylit inspiration - business in tones of brown

Suit: Isaia Cardigan: Malo Shirt: Emanuele Maffeis Shoes: Edward Green 

Bag: Burberry Tie: Drake’s London PS: Viola Milano Shades: Oliver Peoples

Apr 15 '14
mensfashionworld:

Banana Republic Spring/Summer 2014

mensfashionworld:

Banana Republic Spring/Summer 2014

Apr 11 '14
Apr 11 '14
putthison:

eBay Roundup
Check out what Jesse and I found on eBay this week. If you’d like to dig up more auctions, try using our customized search links. We’ve made them for high-end suits, good suits, high-quality shirts and fine footwear. You can use eBay’s search filters to narrow the searches further (narrowing by size is a good start). 
Suits, sport coats, and blazers

Boglioli sport coat, 38
Green tweed, 40
Brown checked sport coat, 41
Brooks blazer, 43

Outerwear

Grey Engineered Garments jacket, various sizes
Barbour International, (36, 38)
Shipley & Halmos field jacket, S
Channel quilted wool jacket, S
Babour x To Ki To hooded hunter jacket, M (but fits like a small)
Barbour Bedale, 38
Post O’Alls beige jacket, S
Nigel Cabourn Aircraft jacket, M
Suede Ralph Lauren jacket, M
Margiela leather jacket, 40
Hunting Jacket Research vest, M
Barbour x To Ki To shirt jacket, M
Buzz Rickson deck jacket, 40
Flight suit, 40
APC flight jacket, L
Ralph Lauren cowboy jacket, L
Vintage Banana Republic coat, L
Barbour fishing jacket, 42
Barbour Galashields, XL
Engineered Garments parka, XL
Bearcat coat, 44
Burberry raincoat, 46


Sweaters and knits

Wings + Horns hoodie, S
Brooks Brothers Fair Isle sweater, L

Shirts and pants

Engineered Garments chambray, L
Seersucker pants, ~30
Madras shorts, 32
Rising Sun jeans, 34


Shoes

Brooks Brothers leather/tweed boots, 8.5
Alden suede longwings, 9
Ralph Lauren Chelsea boots, 9
Crockett & Jones cap toe oxfords, 9.5
Brooks Brothers shell cordovan tassel loafers, 9.5
GJ Cleverly penny loafers, 9.5 (pictured above)
Maison Martin Margiela GATs, 10
Turnbull & Asser paisley Prince Albert slippers, 10
Brooks Brothers cap toe oxfords, 10.5
Leffot suede chukkas, 10.5
Wings + Horns service boots, 11
Gieves & Hawkes buckshot Chlesea boots, 11
Alden shell cordovan penny loafers, 11.5
Alden suede penny loafers, 11.5
Ties

Black & white Ralph Lauren woven tie
Striped Ralph Lauren tie
Navy foulard


Bags, briefcases, and wallets

Mulholland bag
Brooks Black Fleece canvas bag
Valextra briefcase
Black briefcase

Misc.

Key cases (1, 2)
Blue cotton pocket square
Brooklyn Dodgers ballcap, 7 1/4
Braces
Red swim trunks, ~30
Mister Freedom watch cap
Cufflink box
Shoe trees
The History of Men’s Fashion
Old mac & cheese

If you want access to an extra roundup every week, exclusive to members, join Put This On’s Inside Track for just five bucks a month.

putthison:

eBay Roundup

Check out what Jesse and I found on eBay this week. If you’d like to dig up more auctions, try using our customized search links. We’ve made them for high-end suitsgood suitshigh-quality shirts and fine footwear. You can use eBay’s search filters to narrow the searches further (narrowing by size is a good start). 

Suits, sport coats, and blazers
Outerwear
Sweaters and knits
Shirts and pants
Bags, briefcases, and wallets
Misc.
Apr 6 '14
Mar 31 '14
Mar 30 '14
Mar 27 '14

dresslikea:

Inspirational looks from Pitti Uomo 85.

Especially nice combinations of rougher and robust boots & shoes combined with suits, cuffed trousers and lighter garments. And even though spring is just around the corner, there’s still time to rock your roll-necks. 

Photos courtesy of Beams / Elements of Style.

Mar 27 '14

putthison:

It’s On Sale: Footwear at Urban Outfitters

I have a long-standing teenage grudge against Urban Outfitters, but why let integrity and principle get in the way of a 25% discount? All footwear at UO is on sale right now, making a lot of classic casual shoes like Clark’s Wallabees or Red Wing boots one-fourth more affordable, and  unimpeachable summer sneakers like Vans Authentics downright cheap. If you download their app, you also get free shipping.

-Pete

Mar 27 '14
putthison:

How Much Should You Spend on Dress Shoes?
One of the questions I frequently get in my inbox is: “I’m looking to upgrade my dress shoes, and only have X to spend. Should I save up for something better, or is so-and-so brand OK?” Like with many questions we get, a lot of this depends on the person asking.  
It’s worth noting, however, that in footwear (like in everything), there are serious diminishing returns after a certain point. Very roughly speaking, that point tends to be around $350 at full retail, although what’s sold at full retail can be had for less with smart shopping (eBay, factory seconds, seasonal sales, etc).
The Unfortunate Reality of Diminishing Returns
There are a number of things that go into the construction of a good shoe, but the two biggest are: the quality of the leather used and how the soles have been attached. Jesse did a great job in describing the difference between corrected grain and full grain leathers here. It’s also worth noting that even among full-grain leathers, there can be differences in quality. Additionally, most well made shoes will have their shoes attached through a Goodyear or Blake stitching process. Jesse reviewed some of these in the second episode of our video series, and you can read more about each technique here. The short of it is: with a sole that’s been stitched on, rather than glued, you can more easily resole your shoes, which means you don’t have to bin them when the bottoms wear out.
In the past, the “entry price” for good (dress) shoes tended to be around $350. These were usually from Allen Edmonds, Ralph Lauren, and Brooks Brothers, although not everything from these brands were worth buying. There were also some European names such as Herring and Loake’s 1880 line.
After this, you get marginally better constructions, but the differences become smaller and smaller (perhaps a leather insole vs. a fiberboard insole, or a sole that’s been attached by hand rather than machine, or slightly better leathers used for the uppers). Largely, as you move up from the $350 MSRP mark, you’re paying for design. A $1,250 pair of Edward Greens won’t last you 4x longer than a $350 pair from Allen Edmonds, but to many, they’re shaped and finished more handsomely.
The Emergence of a More Competitive Market
The good news is that the market has gotten a lot more competitive in the last five years, and the cost/ benefit curve has smoothed out considerably. Today, there are companies such as Beckett Simonon, John Doe, and Jack Erwin below the $200 price mark (the last of which I was particularly impressed by). Just a hair over $200 is Meermin, which I still think is one of the best values for (relatively) affordable footwear. They have a “Classic” line for about $200 (but with customs and duties, you might pay around $230) and a higher end “Linea Maestro” line for about $300 starting. And at the $350 mark, there’s more than Allen Edmonds and Loake’s 1880 these days. Paul Evans, Kent Wang, and Howard Yount are all good companies to look into.
The question of what someone should spend isn’t about what’s “good” in the footwear market, it’s about what’s “good enough” for you. For dress shoes, the only real criteria are: quality full grain leather uppers and some kind of stitched on sole. Much of the rest is about aesthetics and personal preference.
(Photo: Crockett & Jones’ Whitehall oxfords at Ben Silver)

putthison:

How Much Should You Spend on Dress Shoes?

One of the questions I frequently get in my inbox is: “I’m looking to upgrade my dress shoes, and only have X to spend. Should I save up for something better, or is so-and-so brand OK?” Like with many questions we get, a lot of this depends on the person asking. 

It’s worth noting, however, that in footwear (like in everything), there are serious diminishing returns after a certain point. Very roughly speaking, that point tends to be around $350 at full retail, although what’s sold at full retail can be had for less with smart shopping (eBay, factory seconds, seasonal sales, etc).

The Unfortunate Reality of Diminishing Returns

There are a number of things that go into the construction of a good shoe, but the two biggest are: the quality of the leather used and how the soles have been attached. Jesse did a great job in describing the difference between corrected grain and full grain leathers here. It’s also worth noting that even among full-grain leathers, there can be differences in quality. Additionally, most well made shoes will have their shoes attached through a Goodyear or Blake stitching process. Jesse reviewed some of these in the second episode of our video series, and you can read more about each technique here. The short of it is: with a sole that’s been stitched on, rather than glued, you can more easily resole your shoes, which means you don’t have to bin them when the bottoms wear out.

In the past, the “entry price” for good (dress) shoes tended to be around $350. These were usually from Allen Edmonds, Ralph Lauren, and Brooks Brothers, although not everything from these brands were worth buying. There were also some European names such as Herring and Loake’s 1880 line.

After this, you get marginally better constructions, but the differences become smaller and smaller (perhaps a leather insole vs. a fiberboard insole, or a sole that’s been attached by hand rather than machine, or slightly better leathers used for the uppers). Largely, as you move up from the $350 MSRP mark, you’re paying for design. A $1,250 pair of Edward Greens won’t last you 4x longer than a $350 pair from Allen Edmonds, but to many, they’re shaped and finished more handsomely.

The Emergence of a More Competitive Market

The good news is that the market has gotten a lot more competitive in the last five years, and the cost/ benefit curve has smoothed out considerably. Today, there are companies such as Beckett Simonon, John Doe, and Jack Erwin below the $200 price mark (the last of which I was particularly impressed by). Just a hair over $200 is Meermin, which I still think is one of the best values for (relatively) affordable footwear. They have a “Classic” line for about $200 (but with customs and duties, you might pay around $230) and a higher end “Linea Maestro” line for about $300 starting. And at the $350 mark, there’s more than Allen Edmonds and Loake’s 1880 these days. Paul Evans, Kent Wang, and Howard Yount are all good companies to look into.

The question of what someone should spend isn’t about what’s “good” in the footwear market, it’s about what’s “good enough” for you. For dress shoes, the only real criteria are: quality full grain leather uppers and some kind of stitched on sole. Much of the rest is about aesthetics and personal preference.

(Photo: Crockett & Jones’ Whitehall oxfords at Ben Silver)